Wednesday, May 14, 2008

Thanks for the cash and the work ...

Cheers, Gordon. An extra £120 a year will go a little way to offsetting the (approx) £350 a year extra fuel duty we're paying - and the extra £150 for taxing the cars.

I might even get to code the tax changes. It's all work.

They seem to be running scared at the moment.

And it looks as if even the current social care ripoff (for the English) is considered too generous.

There was "no option" but to sell the house to fund the cost of the home, which they are very happy with but is costly at £700 a week, says Susan.

"After a while it dawned on Mum that this was for good. She became very low when the house was actually gone."


My uncle felt just the same way when his house had to be sold to pay nursing home fees when he had terminal cancer. I thought the NHS was for sick people like that, but there you go. He was an independent sort who spent every spare minute on the house and it broke his heart having to sell it. Naked he came into the world and naked departed it.

Once upon a time families would care for their elderly. Now fewer and fewer even care for their own children.

The number of stay-at-home parents has fallen by a fifth to its lowest level in 15 years, a YouGov poll has found.

Now, 2.2 million parents stay at home, down on 2.8 million in 1993, the survey commissioned by uSwitch.com said.

Many of the 2,198 adults surveyed - of which 1,391 were parents - cited the rising cost of living as the main reason for returning to work.


We were lucky that I earned enough for Susan to stay at home for eight years. For many it's a choice between raising your own kids and keeping a roof over your head. Yet some people manage it, sacrificing the holidays and consumer durables for the chance to raise the next generation.



PS - knee hurting. Switching to rowing machine !

11 comments:

Anonymous said...

It's not just a casae of earning enough for your wife to stay at home Laban - it's also I assume) as case of cutting your coat according to your cloth, and placing the upbringing of your children at the apex of your responsibilities.

JuliaM said...

"...placing the upbringing of your children at the apex of your responsibilities."

'Responsibilities'...?

A dirty word these days!

dr procter said...

Laban,
i'm not one to advise joe public to self-diagnose, but have a read re:sore knee ....

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Runner's_knee

Rob said...

Regarding the selling of a house to pay for nursing care for the elderly - why should someone like me, struggling to afford the chance to buy even a small flat, pay taxes so that the family of the elderly person can inherit a house worth £0.5 million or so?

Yes, it is hard to see the house you have paid for have to be sold to fund your care. Isn't it as hard as forever being prevented even from owning a house, let alone having to sell it?

Rob said...

Regarding Darling's colossal bribe to try to win the bye-election:

""Why Darling, it profits a man nothing to lose his soul for the whole world... but for Crewe?"

Anonymous said...

£1million spent for each floating vote. I do hope its worth it.

DJ said...

Cycling would help too, plus it would balance out muscle development.

John East said...

rob, be careful what you wish for.

If you succeed in your struggles to get that small flat, they might be coming after you next using your argument against you. After all, there will still be thousands more without a flat, and they'll all be eyeing you hungrily as they cast their votes.

G Orwell. said...

Go swimming - that will be easy on the joints.

"Anonymous Anonymous said...

It's not just a casae of earning enough for your wife to stay at home Laban - it's also I assume) as case of cutting your coat according to your cloth,"
The problem is that someone else takes your cloth and gives it to the irresponsible

Anonymous said...

And don't forget that the £120 is borrowed. You'll have to pay it back later, with interest, and other additions to fund the wastrels whose hands it's coming and going through.

It's not as if they've actually reduced anything to give you your money back, oh dear no.

Anonymous said...

As a Scottish tax payer, I can see where my tax money is going, (pretty much). If I was an English tax payer, I think I would be asking where is my tax money going?